June 12, 2011 | Lisa Childers

Part of my work for Globus Online User Services involves moving a great deal of data. Indeed, within the past 7 months I have singlehandedly moved over a petabyte of data using Globus Online. For any given transfer, verifying that the data at the destination matches the source is not always necessary (such as when executing a test run preparatory to a large transfer, or trying to better understand the user interactions enabled by a new GO feature.) In these cases the transferred data is a mere side effect.

June 10, 2011 | Vas Vasiliadis

.. is that they now come with enormous disks. So we are seeing research workers storing everything from patient Xrays to car proving-ground videos on their Windows-7 machines with terabyte disks.

June 7, 2011 | Vas Vasiliadis

Natural Language Processing (NLP) has the potential to dramatically influence the way in which clinical care and medical research is conducted. Pilot studies have shown that NLP engines, such as MedLEE and MetaMap, and the use of community-defined medical ontologies like the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), can help to more accurately identify disease risks and environmental factors in patient clinical narratives. In addition to helping improve disease diagnosis, NLP can help automate the analysis of patient narratives over extended visits and across a wide sampling of subjects.

June 1, 2011 | Raj Kettimuthu

Last month we launched a “User of the Month” program to draw attention to particularly impressive, innovative and/or widely applicable usage scenarios that the entire user community should know about. For our 2nd User of the Month, I’m happy to announce that we have selected Steven Gottlieb from Indiana University.

May 25, 2011 | Lee Liming

I get a kick out of seeing "ordinary" information technologies make new kinds of science possible. For example, the ability to move and share digital data is a pretty mundane topic in computer science circles. The mass market entertainment industry (think: iTunes, Netflix) has even brought streaming data and multi-megabyte files into our living rooms--for fun! Despite this dramatic adoption and transformation in some industries, there are still plenty of areas where the effects are being felt for the first time.

May 19, 2011 | Brigitte Raumann

I think I can speak for most biologists when I say I never thought I would be worrying about file transfer.  Compute power, yes.  Storage space, maybe.  But file transfer?  Never. Unlike some other scientific disciplines, biology is not a traditionally ‘big data’ science.  Generally, biologists produce data on the scale suited to e-mail attachments.  However, seemingly overnight, biology has been propelled into the ranks of the big data sciences.  Now a biologist can easily find herself confronted with terabytes of data.  Why the change?  The answer lies in the recent quantum leaps in DNA sequencing technology.

May 16, 2011 | Stuart Martin

I am delighted to write this inaugural post for "GO Behind the Scenes" -- our Dev column in the new Globus Online (GO) blog. Entries could come from any member of the GO development team.  We're looking to provide a small window into what we do to make GO ..er..uh.. go! This one comes from Stuart Martin, the GO software development manager for the backend.  (The backend is the engine that takes the file transfer requests and moves the bytes from point A to point B.)   Since we like to plan big, we run all of GO on Amazon's EC2.  This way, when the time comes, we will be able to run instances worldwide. 

May 11, 2011 | Paul Dave

We are very pleased to see so many of our users utilizing Globus Online to support their scientific research -- this week I heard one user had moved 6TB of data over the course of 2 days. Other users would benefit from hearing more of these stories, to see what your colleagues are achieving and to give you ideas for your own work. So, we've decided to pick a User of the Month to draw attention to particularly impressive, innovative and/or widely applicable usage scenarios that the entire user community should know about. For our inaugural selection, I'm happy to announce May's User of the Month is NERSC (National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center).

May 9, 2011 | Ian Foster

As I pondered what tone to set for this blog, I tried to put myself in the shoes of the professional researcher. While I’ve lived that life, the everyday life of the dedicated, full-time researcher today has changed (and is changing) beyond what I’ve experienced, and I feel for you all out there who are challenged day-in, day-out with getting your work done in a rapidly changing world. For many researchers today, it’s all about wrangling massive data using faster and faster computers, while also struggling to keep ahead of the crowd by forging and sustaining ever-more-ambitious interdisciplinary collaborations. Those of you who have access to the right tools for these tasks are in the minority: Sure, big science projects have capabilities for getting and working with the data they need. But the average hardworking independent researcher or smaller lab does not. So the challenge (and opportunity) is to make these capabilities accessible not just to a few “big science” projects but to every researcher everywhere.

May 9, 2011 | Ian Foster

Welcome to the Globus Online blog! On these pages we plan to present/discuss/debate a range of topics dear to the hearts of computational researchers: data movement, information sharing and collaboration, SaaS tools for researchers, grid vs. cloud (and who cares), and of course Monty Python. Most importantly, we will highlight stories about – and from – users who have found ways to use Globus Online to improve their work. The goal is to create a resource and forum to help make your lives easier.